John Ford

Ford, JohnCheyenne Autumn (1964). One of Ford’s finest. When the Cheyenne, already long into their return to their homeland, split into two factions, one’s heart breaks.

Cheyenne Autumn

Cheyenne Autumn

Ford, John: Fort Apache (1948). –  A study of the martinet, and his disregard of the respect due to life. John Wayne acts well, and Monument Valley outdoes everyone.

Still from Fort Apache

Still from Fort Apache

Ford, John; Marshall, George; Hathaway, Henry: How The West Was Won (1962). Ruthlessly; it’s mostly gone now, so quickly. Without this sentiment rising, the film would be merely a ruckus of silliness. Ford’s segment on the Civil War is the best. How a country supposedly built on lofty ideals could have descended into that barbarity are a question, lesson, and fact too often put aside.

Yakima Canute would have admired the stunts. Odd how the whites, with right and without retribution, can drive the reds from their lands and enslave the blacks away from theirs. And then progress to the building of four-level freeways over a waterless Los Angeles.

Ford, John: The Informant (1935). The CulturalRites article is here.

Victor McLaglen in The Infomer

Victor McLaglen in The Infomer

Ford, John: The Searchers (1956). The CulturalRites article is here.

The famous closing shot of The Searchers

The famous closing shot of The Searchers

Ford, John: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). Another fine film by Ford, with excellent acting by John Wayne.

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

Ford, John: Wagon Master (1950). The CulturalRites article is here.

Wagon Master

Wagon Master

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